IKE’S LIST OF DOMAINS AT AUCTION FOR Tuesday, November 21st

Nov 21 2017


Escrow.com

Last night I commented on Raymond’s latest post on TheDomains.com. Apparently Rick Schwartz tweeted about being upset with Godaddy for allowing people to bid on expired domains that they own, at least I think that’s what he’s saying.

There may be a few misconceptions here based on Ricks tweets and the comments after the article.  I could be wrong but I feel like I have a pretty good grasp on the Godaddy domain life cycle.

First off, you can’t bid on your own auctions. The auction says “you are the owner”.  You could, in theory, bid on a name that you own, but that is part of Godaddy’s expired inventory. I have no idea why you would do this as Godaddy will get the proceeds. I also have no way of knowing who is bidding on the names at Godaddy, but I feel like they have been pretty good at regulating the auctions. I think that paying a yearly fee lowers the amount of false bidders, and as most of the auctions are their own expired inventory, I am not concerned about shill bidding. If they were bidding up their own auctions there would be hell to pay, and there are too many people working there to keep that a secret.

Next, What would the motive be for bidding on your own expired domain? The only thing I can think of that makes any kind of sense is to artificially inflate the price. With this theory the owner would renew and pay the Godaddy reinstatement fee or transfer the domain to another registrar, while hoping the final sales price gets recorded at NameBio, giving the seller a free appraisal and comp.

As I said above, the owner can simply move the domain for $8, so bidding on the name instead of paying the transfer fee seems crazy. Best case scenario you let the name go to closeouts and pay the $5 +reg fee, but you’re still paying more than the transfer.

Raymond posted a quote from Paul Nicks from a previous interview. He talks about the 45 day auto renew grace period during which the auction starts at day 25, with the name being transferred into the winning bidders account on day 42 maybe 45, it’s not clear. No where does he mention the additional Redemption period that starts after the name has been deleted.

This is the time period that was originally intended as the fail safe for people to recover their expired domains, but it has been superseded by the auction process. Godaddy charges the reinstatement fee of $80 once the auction has started and this money goes to Godaddy. If you have a name that has entered  redemption the max fee to recover the domain should also be $80, according to Verisign, and that money goes to Verisign. In theory you could manually delete all of your expired domains, pushing them into redemption and causing Godaddy to be unable to auction them.

But again why would you do any of this when you can transfer the domain to another registrar? As Raymond’s article says, Rick S. is unhappy with Godaddy and transferring his domains away, but I am still unclear what it is he’s upset about. I thought it was common knowledge that you could bid on any expired inventory, including names that you own that are expired, but why the hell would you do that in the first place?

 

Main List

Cartograph.com Fancy way to saw or make a map

The No Bid List

BestKidEver.com This is anomaly, no one thinks their kid is the best kid ever all the time

BloodBucket.com Like brand bucket except for blood. No idea what I mean by that

BronxRental.com Lot’s of people and things to rent

BuzzBattle.com A ganja competition, which strain gives you the best buzz

CashTrix.com

CasinoVenture.com Build your own system to beat the house and sell it to suckers

DoItOnlyOnce.com Don’t have to repeat this task, once and done.  Maybe it’s a call to action for paint

DrugAssure.com Make sure you’re taking the right drugs

EntireReport.com Not just half the report, the whole thing

EuroGuy.com

FewTell.com Not much info, no one talks about it

GetMyToken.com Create your own personal token or coin

HeartKeep.com A locket or something dear to your heart

HelpLot.com Help a lot, but shorter

HurtStop.com Pain relief

iGoNuts.com

JrBenefits.com

LessToDo.com

MileCash.com A hybrid mix of cigarette rewards. Do these even exist anymore?

MoneyMillion.com

MrBravo.com

NewVow.com Renew your vows

NoVerdict.com The jury is still out

OnRoot.com

OutForMore.com

OwnParadise.com  A sales site for exotic property, own your own little piece of Paradise

PaymentLocker.com Keep your payments secure

PintMe.com

RunningSafe.com Reflective vests and bear spray

SemiDrivers.com

ShaneMoney.com

Shane now has his own coin, built on the blockchain

SirSold.com

SwipeTrades.com

TryPeace.com

TwoChains.com Not just one but 2 chains, maybe it forked

WarOnFraud.com

ZTester.com

More Names With No Bids

Names With Bids

contaq.com

ithomas.com

BitCoinCourses.com

StriveChallenge.com

BlissfulCreations.com

QuizBuddy.com

netuo.com

drivify.com

CoinChick.com

InfoEng.com

CarolinaSprings.com

luxliner.com

LifetimeWeed.com

Sanctuaria.com

ManyBitCoin.com

SearchSpell.com

FindYourAuto.com

PleaseWeed.com

UpScend.com

Datapoint.org

FolkLord.com

More Names With No Bids

Namejet

Immunizing.com
CommonDriver.com
30022.com
DarkHeat.com
Wisting.com
rosum.com
Alme.com
SeedWorker.com
LethalShot.com
SwitchSeats.com
LiveDeep.com
TravelSetup.com
texted.com
GloriousPast.com
SheLikesMoney.com
VirtualTesting.com
NeedWife.com

Flippa/SEDO

oboxo.com Nice little brandable

Save Money With Daddy Bulk Domain Registration

Your LLLL.coms of The Day

TvBe.com
myfe.com
pzel.com
uopd.com
lmux.com
uwbk.com
nmux.com
jvuk.com

LLLL’s that End Users Might use someday

cgba.net
gygg.net
mjhs.net
mhgr.net

LLL’s, CCC’s, 5L’s

pp3.com
vyt.co
cqh.co
Del.tv
dqe.co
gcrnw.com
bjxpr.com
shzng.com
cdqqw.com
shmny.com
frssw.com
pppyp.com
ssshs.com

Brandables

Boggos.com
Carmys.com
Chomaz.com
Citylu.com
Dezipa.com
Dunzie.com
Fazini.com
Femzon.com
Fudzy.com
Glowza.com
Govima.com
Gronzy.com
Honoon.com
Jereck.com
Keppos.com
Kopegy.com
Kuzva.com
Leanesta.com
Photogy.com
Rebso.com
Scienzia.com
Shroove.com
Tesov.com
Tozili.com
Unurn.com
Yagolo.com
Yeskea.com
Youzie.com
Zecity.com
Zicup.com

MORE Short Brand Dot Coms HERE

Some Numbers

333493.com
923580.com
610210.com

One Worders and Other TLD’s

Steelman.org
Stub.us
Datapoint.org
Coherency.org
Selfheal.org
Fuzz.tv
BuzzPlant.org
Tapas.tv
Doxa.cc
BidCoin.me
Musters.org
Windlass.org

Vape, Weed and Vegan Names and  VR

Snap Names/DropCatch

Movify.com

StartANewLife.com

VR81.COM

NamePros

ProvenRecipes.com
ReservedFunds.com
WebDesignBlog.net
ListedStock.com
TaxWage.com

EyeHospital.net
ModernPencil.com
Divstar.com
WebApplication.info
Hoopspedia.com

WeedPacket.com
AdvancedLink.com
DroneBandits.com
PriceProjections.com
HomeBank.net

Godaddy Value BIN

 

Godaddy Value BIN

Available Names

Available for Reg Fee big list

Have a name at auction and need more exposure? Send me an email. We Charge $10 per name per day. We may be able to help. If you have an auction you want to promote, email us for details.*All names chosen by us, Shane and Josh . (ie you click through and purchase a name you like) or an occasional paid listing. Everything we say is based on our own research or is opinion. Do your own due diligence. That means look it up yourself if you don’t think the stats or our opinion is correct. We hand choose the names but we are paid to make this list by both the auction houses, individuals that are auctioning names, and Godaddy affiliate links. Keep that in mind and only buy names that YOU think are good

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About the author

I grew a beard while I was on vacation. I had to shave it off to go back to work.

View all articles by Josh E

8 comments

  1. ShaneCultra

    His boycott of Godaddy reminds me of Will Ferrell going streaking in Old School. Out there by himself.

    It’s a pain in the ass but we’re dealing with other people’s expiring domains, not private sales. They have rights as much as the person buying them. Take away those rights on renewal and we’d have even more problems

  2. John

    The owner of a name shouldn’t be allowed to bid on their own name at auction. If they are that’s a problem.
    The owner of a name that goes to an auction that goes to completion shouldn’t be allowed to renew it.
    GoDaddy is a big enough company with enough money to figure out how to make it work.


    1. Post author
      Josh E

      In the situation I referenced the only thing it would do is make Godaddy more money. I think you can make the case that Godaddy quasi controls it at that point, but again why would you do it, there’s little to no benefit for the registrant to bid. Even if it’s for appraisal purposes the data would be tainted.

      As far as not being able to renew your domain you would have to change the icann rules or end Auto Renew grace as soon as the auction is over. Namejet works this way and you can still renew the name up until the auction ends, maybe even during the auction depending on the registrar. The difference is that most of the registrars have convoluted renewal or transfer processes, like netsol and register.com and the user agreements are written differently so that auto renew grace ends at the completion or start of the auction. (not sure which).

      Take name.com for example. They’re inventory goes through namejet and then if there are no bidders it goes to a diminishing price auction on their own site. This means that somehow they have flexibility when to transfer the name and end the autorenew grace period. Godaddy can do the same thing, the original registrants ownership would end at the completion of the auction or when the winning bidder pays for the domain. Also if you notice, some namejet auctions start at different times or don’t acutally go through even after backorders are placed, or names are delayed transferring accounts depending on the registrar.

      It makes me nervous when a registrar can start changing the rules and/or doesn’t have checks and balances. I understand that it can be frustrating to win an auction and not get the name.

  3. John Johns

    When Ricky doesn’t get his way, he likes to cry publicly about it. Poor, poor Ricky. I really feel for him. Good analysis on why this isn’t a big deal …. except to Rick. Grow up, mr. millionaire. The world doesn’t revolve around you.

  4. Ategy

    The real interesting question is .. who actually owns the “expired” domain at that point?
    .
    1- If it’s the registrant, then why is the registrar even auctioning it?
    2- If it’s the registrar, then the “original” registrant isn’t even technically registering their own domain!
    .
    I know the truth is something in between, hidden in the legalese .. but still interesting question …
    .
    .
    As for the “Redemption” phase … I thought that was only actually used in legal situations and not really a usual option (between ~day 45 and ~80)?
    .
    Otherwise I think the actual purpose for that redemption phase was more to create a clear separation from the expired owner. Basically that for 40 days, emails/traffic will bounce, which is what (ICANN and/or Verisign) consider to be a fair amount of time in wish a large portion of previous visitors/contacts will get clear email bounce errors and “domain not found” errors .. giving a signal that the old owner is no longer in control of the domain. Which all kinda makes sense when you think about it.


    1. Post author
      Josh E

      Redemption is the time period before pending delete that cannot be changed or altered by the registrar and is determined by the registry. Names in redemption can still be renewed by the owner, the registry collects the fee. Last year I sold a .pics that was in redemption, the .pics redemption period is 120 days, So I paid the fee to reinstate the name and sell it. Any name at godaddy can be renewed this way, so long as it didn’t sell in the auction process. If you go to the expired section of your dashboard, you’ll see names recoverable through the Godaddy and names recoverable through the Registry, these names are in registry redemption.

      The reason I say that it’s the fail safe is that the original intent was for the owner to be able to have a longer period to save the name. Registrars were then allowed to change the user agreement to be able to monetize this inventory. There’s a shit load of money going through the expired auctions and in the case of verisign, they probably allowed this to mitigate the amount of names going through the drop and to decrease the power of drop catchers, but I’m just speculating.

      1. Ategy

        Wow .. you learn something new every day! Thanks .. makes a bit more sense now. I did notice some of my domains I let expire kick around waaaaaay longer than expected in my “expired domains” folder .. never really figured it out because some seemed to leave much earlier .. guess those were the ones picked up on auction. Although it seems some get stuck in limbo .. which I had tracked all this a little better from the start.
        .
        Do you know when the WhoIs info changes? Seems before the original registrant’s info stayed much longer than it does now (now it switches to showing “c/o GoDaddy Redemption services” and GoDaddy’s actual address info, before even the end of the auction period)

  5. Ategy

    FYI .. got this in my email from Godaddy within the last 1-2 hours:

    “Good morning,
    We are making a change to our domain name expiry process and wanted to give you enough notice to make decisions on your portfolio. GoDaddy is changing the domain renewal timeline from 42 to 30 days for most domains. Based on our research, less than 1% of our customers renew after 30 days.
    Starting Dec 4, the following changes will happen to expired domain names:
    • After Day 5 of expiration, DNS, email, hosting, redirecting and any other DNS-dependent services will be interrupted and stop working.
    • After Day 30 of expiration, domain names are no longer able to be renewed or transferred away.
    We wanted to give a heads -up so you have enough notice to make decisions on your portfolio. As always please don’t hesitate to reach out with any questions.
    Thanks,”

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