Some of my Domain Sales in the Second Half of 2016

Jan 07 2017

While the first half of my 2016 sales was dominated by liquid domains and Chinese buyers, the second half was more balanced with a couple keyword domains, and to use a baseball analogy, it was also balanced between singles, doubles and triples. Below is a sample of my domain sales from the second half of the year.

holy cow

HolyCow.com – Discussions with this buyer began in January 2015, yet the Escrow.com agreement wasn’t finalized until June 2016, with the first of three payments received in July through Escrow.com’s domain holding transaction. It was nearly 18 months of off-and-on discussions and over 150 emails to get the deal finalized. I appreciated the guys’ feedback on the DomainSherpa review at NamesCon last year….while I was confident in the domain’s value, it’s always good to get additional opinions. The buyer upgraded from their developed HolyCow.ch; they’re a Switzerland-based fast casual burger chain that is expanding, and they’re lead by some smart guys (and genuinely good guys) at the top. I bought the domain in 2014, and thankfully turned down an offer to double my money within a week of acquisition.

Transporting.com – I mentioned when I bought the name last year that I wasn’t a huge “-ing” fan, so when an offer came in for a 70% gain in a little over a year, I took it. Sales price is public on NameBio. There are plenty of companies that could use the domain as an upgrade to their existing domain name, so I believe there is still upside in the name to the buyer, who is looking to flip it. Sedo was very helpful in getting the transaction completed, which I discussed here.

Couple Handfuls of CCC.com – These ranged in price from $500-ish for KN4.com, IZ4.com and CV6.com, to over $1,000 each for names like A84.com, BZ4.com and UD5.com, and several more in between. Some were private sales, and others were part of the auction we ran with NameJet. The acquisition prices were in the $200-$300 range on most of these a couple years ago…….the CCC domains have always treated me well.

Portfolio of One Word .Info Domains – I’m not sure what the heck I was thinking buying a portfolio of .info domains earlier this year. Names like SAT.info, Inbox.info, etc. I bought them, split a few of them up to be sold in separate auctions, and bundled the remainder into another auction. I doubled my money, but since the profits were $xxx, it wasn’t really worth my time….because buying and selling (transfers, payments, auction listings, etc) takes more time than most people care to admit. Oh well, live and learn, and always continue to experiment.

ChemistryTeacher.com – I only include this one because it’s another example of a sale without big bucks, but it’s another case that shows the opportunity that exists in domaining…bought for $105 earlier this year, and sold for $364 a few months later. There are flipping acquisition possibilities like this that come up every day; I’m personally not that great at finding them (I saw this one on Shane’s list), but many people are. Opportunity abounds.

You’re welcome to share any of your recent sales below, or critique mine listed above.

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7 comments

  1. Doron Vermaat

    Thanks for sharing Aaron. I absolutely love HolyCow.com and remember how it was discussed in the DS panel at NamesCon together with a domain name I own, MovingUp.com – my goal is to add some domains of that caliber to my portfolio this year.


    1. Post author
      Aaron

      Thanks Doron, I definitely remember the discussion of MovingUp.com, and you smartly turned down Andrew’s offers.
      Looking forward to seeing you in a couple weeks.

  2. Hemant Tilotia

    The post and the comments indicate that I still need to do a lot more trial and errors before getting some sense.
    I bought Toonworld.com , thanks to Shane’s list recently, and many more in the past, so going through it has become a routine nowadays.

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